Daredevils

People who are protesting the lockdown, not practicing social distancing (er… in a protest glued to each other) not wearing masks or doing anything to protect themselves and others are like reckless drivers taking a gamble on life, like smokers, alcoholics, people taking risk at every chance they get. Fine if that’s your gig and you don’t mind putting your life on the line for nothing. The problem lies when you are endangering others. With your reckless living. If you are a silent carrier, and the person you infect is at high risk, you are killing her or him. May you had been obeying the lockdown, the chances of this person coming into contact to you would have been lessen. Probably non existent. So live with that. Wear your trump cap while protesting a lockdown ordered by trump himself. That makes a lot of sense. The Trump brand.

Photo credit Joshua A.Bickel / The Columbus Dispatch, via Associated Press

You could catch this virus so randomly. As said previously, the only 100% safe way to not catching thus not spreading it is to come in contact with nothing exterior (food package, deliveries etc…) and no one. How much you are willing to give, how far you are willing to go to stop the virus. Is only upon you. No society or government can tell you. But this magma of will, that we create, all of us as a force to stop the virus, the bigger it gets the faster we stop it. So the more you give up, the quicker it stops. But if we all interact with only a quarter or even half the people we usually interact with, that will amount somehow to the time it takes to kick that virus out. A magma of will, the will to give things up as we knew them, we took for granted but in the grand scheme of things aren’t essential. It’s hard not to see your parents or your kids, grandparents for 2 years. Or your significant other. But if needed, we can do it. It gets a bit easier when weighting socializing. Friends and acquaintances, the fun in life, the bars the restaurants, the manicure pedicure. But for the teenagers, the kids, the college students, it’s taking a chunk out of decisive formative times out of their life. Or just perhaps they get to do it differently then we did. It may not be for the worse. When judged and compared with what we know, it’s of course griming. But for centuries before us, people have been doing it differently. The form, not the essential existing. That will never change.

So let’s give as much power as possible to this magma of will. That’s what we are trying to do here. It’s not about politics, it’s not about ourselves, it’s about being the best we can as a specie. The virus too is trying to be its best possible. It’s about winning as a specie against a virus. In biological terms. If you remove the science, the doctors, the governments and it was just this earth, animals and us, that’s what we do. We try to survive against those who attack us.

Why not take our focus off other things. That aren’t as important right now.
Why not rise up and try to make a better place in consideration of this huge force coming at us. If it’s only a 2-3 years ordeal, society and government as we know it in the US might be able to persist, relatively unchanged and a lot of people will suffer greatly from it. But if it were a 50 years ordeal like the plague or even 40 years like AIDS (this epidemic isn’t over yet) then we need to readjust a lot of things for society to function. Given the infection rate and for exemple how the south in the US generates 50% of HIV diagnostics between 2010-2016, things may get hard down in the South. In the US, the AIDS epidemic killed 16,300 people in 2017. That’s less than half of how many people died from COVID in the last 2.5 months only in the US (37,782 to this day).

Needless to say, that if the COVID-19 pandemic was to last 50 years, major adjustments to our society needs to be made, health care wise. If we need to practice major social distancing reducing our ability to work thus to have heath care, how are we supposed to get treated if infected.
Or not, not adjust anything and make life a living hell for the majority, so that the big corporations can continue to profit. We just feed them, grease them oil them. Instead of taking care of people’s need.

“In the midst of the twin crises that we face — the coronavirus pandemic and the meltdown of our economy — it’s imperative that we re-examine some of the foundations of American society, understand why they are failing us, and fight for a fairer and more just nation.[…]

The absurdity and cruelty of our employer-based, private health insurance system should now be apparent to all. As tens of millions of Americans are losing their jobs and incomes as a result of the pandemic, many of them are also losing their health insurance. That is what happens when health care is seen as an employee benefit, not a guaranteed right. As we move forward beyond the pandemic, we need to pass legislation that finally guarantees health care to every man, woman and child — available to people employed or unemployed, at every age.

The pandemic has also made clear the irrationality of the current system. Unbelievably, in the midst of the worst health care crisis in modern history, thousands of medical workers are being laid off and many hospitals and clinics are on the verge of going bankrupt and shutting down. In truth, we don’t have a health care “system.” We have a byzantine network of medical institutions dominated by the profit-making interests of insurance and drug companies. The goal of a new, long-overdue health care system, Medicare for All, must be to provide health care to all, in every region of the country — not billions in profits for Wall Street and the health care industry. […]

In addition to millions of lower-income families not having any health insurance, Covid-19 virus is vicious and incredibly opportunistic in attacking people with pre-existing conditions and weakened immune systems. For a wide variety of socio-economic reasons, it is the poor and working class in this country who are exactly in that position as they suffer higher rates of diabetes, drug addiction, obesity, stress, high blood pressure, asthma and heart disease — and are most vulnerable to the virus. Poor and working-class people have lower life expectancies than rich people in general, and that tragic unfairness remains even truer with regard to this pandemic. […]

Further, while doctors, governors and mayors tell us that we should isolate ourselves and stay at home, and rich people head off to their second homes in less populated areas, working-class people don’t have those options. When you are living paycheck to paycheck, and you lack paid medical and family leave, staying home is not an option. If you’re going to feed your family and pay the rent, you have to go to work. And, for the working class, that means leaving your home and doing jobs that interact with other people, some of whom are spreading the virus. […]

If there is any silver lining in the horrible pandemic and economic collapse we’re experiencing, it is that many in our country are now beginning to rethink the basic assumptions underlying the American value system. Should we really continue along the path of greed and unfettered capitalism, in which three people own more wealth than the bottom half of the nation, and tens of millions live in economic desperation — struggling to put food on the table, pay for housing and education and put a few dollars aside for retirement? Or should we go forward in a very new direction?” […]

I get very tired of the politicians and pundits who tell us how difficult it is to bring about fundamental changes in our society. “It always seems impossible until it is done,” Nelson Mandela is widely reported to have said. Let’s get to work and get it done.Bernie Sanders: The Foundations of American Society Are Failing Us

I truly hope business goes well for you. You,  choosing to endangering others for your own gain or comfort. I do hope you the best. At the same time, I’m not certain that you will do so great as a business for the next couple months, years or lifetime. I’m not convinced people won’t be self disciplined and rule it as unnecessary. I mean dying or infecting someone for having gotten a pedicure is not worth the risk. Temptation will be there, let the people be the judges. Let the health care system be the mesure of those choices we make. The less we social distance the bigger load on it. And failure.
Unless we fix it.
Then maybe we have a chance at resuming life with its superficial and inessential filling.